Civil and Human Rights

What Scalia knows about illegal searches

It won’t surprise anyone that Justice Antonin Scalia wrote a scathing dissent in a Supreme Court case that came down last week. But it might surprise some people that three members of the court’s so-called liberal wing joined him.

 

Scalia argued that searching the car of Prado Navarette, pulled over on suspicion of drunken driving, violated the Fourth Amendment’s protections against unreasonable searches and seizures. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor agreed.

 

This seemingly idiosyncratic lineup is a developing bloc in Fourth Amendment cases, and it’s one to keep any eye on as the court hears two even bigger such cases Tuesday. In Riley v. California and United States v. Wurie, the court will consider whether the police may search the contents of an arrestee’s cell phone without a warrant…. [Read more at CNN.com.]

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