Federal Courts and Nominations

RELEASE: High Court Urged To Adapt Its Argument Schedule To Extraordinary Circumstances

“Whether it means holding videoconference or telephonic hearings as other federal courts do, or using some other method, we are confident the Supreme Court can adapt to the extraordinary circumstances in which we find ourselves and continue to do its job.” — CAC President Elizabeth Wydra

WASHINGTON – Following news of the Supreme Court’s postponement of upcoming oral arguments, Constitutional Accountability Center President Elizabeth Wydra issued the following reaction:

We understand and respect the Supreme Court’s announcement of the postponement of oral arguments as an acknowledgment of the health and safety of the justices, court personnel, litigants, and the communities in which they live and work. However, this postponement should not delay the high court’s resolution of the critical cases currently pending before it, particularly the cases involving congressional and grand jury subpoenas of the President’s financial records. Whether it means holding videoconference or telephonic hearings as other federal courts do, or using some other method, we are confident the Supreme Court can adapt to the extraordinary circumstances in which we find ourselves and continue to do its job. Such adaptation would honor both the significance of the issues that lie before the Court this term, and the significance of the Court at the head of one of our three branches of government.

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Resources:

CAC case page, Trump v. Mazars (consolidated with Trump v. Deutsche Bank): https://www.theusconstitution.org/litigation/trump-v-mazars-usa-llp/

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Constitutional Accountability Center is a think tank, public interest law firm, and action center dedicated to fulfilling the progressive promise of the Constitution’s text and history. Visit CAC’s website at www.theusconstitution.org.

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