Access to Justice

RELEASE: Conservative Justices Deny Accountability to Family After Cross-Border Killing of Their Son

“The bottom line take-away after today’s ruling is that U.S. border guards can continue to abuse their power with impunity.” — CAC Civil Rights Director David Gans

WASHINGTON – On news this morning that the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 5-4 ruling in Hernández v. Mesa—with the five conservative Justices voting against the family of a boy fatally shot by a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent that attempted to sue for damages in federal court—Constitutional Accountability Center issued the following reaction:

CAC Chief Counsel Brianne Gorod said, “The Court’s majority today fails to take seriously the role that the Founders assigned the courts as checks on unconstitutional government action. As Justice Ginsburg notes in her dissent, the death in this case is ‘not an isolated incident.’ The result of the Court’s decision today will be as troubling as it is unsurprising: continued abuses of governmental power.”

CAC Civil Rights Director David Gans added, “The bottom line take-away after today’s ruling is that U.S. border guards can continue to abuse their power with impunity. The Court has closed the courthouse doors on those victimized by federal officers, leaving them with no remedy.”

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Resources:

CAC case page, Hernández v. Mesa: https://www.theusconstitution.org/litigation/hernandez-v-mesa-u-s-sup-ct/

“A Murdered Mexican Boy and the Abuse of American Power at the Border,” David Gans, The New Republic, February 20, 2017: https://newrepublic.com/article/140746/murdered-mexican-boy-abuse-american-power-border

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Constitutional Accountability Center is a think tank, public interest law firm, and action center dedicated to fulfilling the progressive promise of the Constitution’s text and history. Visit CAC’s website at www.theusconstitution.org.

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